Yuungnaqpiallerput/The Way We Genuinely Live: Masterworks of Yup'ik Science and Survival

Description:

A major traveling exhibition comprised of extraordinary 19th and 20th century objects made by Yup'ik people. The exhibition also contains interactive elements that reveal the Yup'ik peoples' sophisticated understanding of the phenomenological and material world around them. Organized by Ann Fienup-Riordan in collaboration with the Yup'ik people of central Alaska and the Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center.

s:
<p>At &quot;Waterproof Clothing,&quot; visitors can rotate cylinders of water and determine which of three materials is the most waterproof. (&copy; Chris Arend, photographer, and the Anchorage Museum Rasmuson Center.)</p>

Bentwood hats, which were used for ocean travel and hunting, reduced the glare, protected the face from splashing water, and focused and amplified sound. At this exhibit, visitors can experience the effects of focusing sound. (© Chris Arend, photographer, and the Anchorage Museum Rasmuson Center.)

<p>At &quot;Waterproof Clothing,&quot; visitors can rotate cylinders of water and determine which of three materials is the most waterproof. (&copy; Chris Arend, photographer, and the Anchorage Museum Rasmuson Center.)</p> thumbnail
<p>At &quot;Waterproof Clothing,&quot; visitors can rotate cylinders of water and determine which of three materials is the most waterproof. (&copy; Chris Arend, photographer, and the Anchorage Museum Rasmuson Center.)</p>

At "Uses of Seal Oil," visitors can smell the oil and compare skins cured with and without seal oil. (© Chris Arend, photographer, and the Anchorage Museum Rasmuson Center.)

<p>At &quot;Waterproof Clothing,&quot; visitors can rotate cylinders of water and determine which of three materials is the most waterproof. (&copy; Chris Arend, photographer, and the Anchorage Museum Rasmuson Center.)</p> thumbnail
<p>At &quot;Waterproof Clothing,&quot; visitors can rotate cylinders of water and determine which of three materials is the most waterproof. (&copy; Chris Arend, photographer, and the Anchorage Museum Rasmuson Center.)</p>

At "Ways to Make a Seal Gut Raincoat," visitors can try to sew waterproof stitches. (© Chris Arend, photographer, and the Anchorage Museum Rasmuson Center.)

<p>At &quot;Waterproof Clothing,&quot; visitors can rotate cylinders of water and determine which of three materials is the most waterproof. (&copy; Chris Arend, photographer, and the Anchorage Museum Rasmuson Center.)</p> thumbnail
<p>At &quot;Waterproof Clothing,&quot; visitors can rotate cylinders of water and determine which of three materials is the most waterproof. (&copy; Chris Arend, photographer, and the Anchorage Museum Rasmuson Center.)</p>

At "Waterproof Clothing," visitors can rotate cylinders of water and determine which of three materials is the most waterproof. (© Chris Arend, photographer, and the Anchorage Museum Rasmuson Center.)

<p>At &quot;Waterproof Clothing,&quot; visitors can rotate cylinders of water and determine which of three materials is the most waterproof. (&copy; Chris Arend, photographer, and the Anchorage Museum Rasmuson Center.)</p> thumbnail
Date:
2008
Client:
  • Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center
Role:
Consulting Exhibit Developer
Funder:
  • National Science Foundation #0515387
Footprint:
10,000 square feet
Venue:
  • Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center
Collaborators:
Ann Riorden, Suzi Jones, Beverly Serrell, Presentation Design Group, Oregon Museum of Science and Industry